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Subharmonicon goes into production if

Posted: Thu Aug 22, 2019 4:43 pm
by Username1573
Hi folks.

I hope this post finds you well.
I was very excited during Moogfest 2018 when I got to build a Subharmonicon.
It was the final push I needed to plunge down the rabbit hole of Eurorack.
At first I built all modules around the Subharmonicon. Basically only effects and CV.
But eventually (after daily use) I got afraid I might get wear and tear on this beautiful Synth. So for now it is just on display in my living room and I wish I would find the courage to play it again.
But I'm just too scared of using it too much and eventually breaking it.

Sorry for the long introduction of Subharmonical nostalgia.
I actually just wanted to inform you guys that there is a petition out there which is even supported by Loopop to get the Subharmonicon into production. Even if just "made to order".

So if I can kindly convince you to support this project I would be very very thankful, and so will be the Synth community.
Yes the Subharmonicon is weird gear, but has being weird ever stopped something from being loved by synthists?

Sign the petition here:
https://www.ipetitions.com/petition/get ... production


Many many thanks!!!!!
And thanks to Steve Dunnington for creating the subharmonicon. It enriched my live on a level I can hardly explain.

Re: Subharmonicon goes into production if

Posted: Thu Aug 29, 2019 1:46 am
by Freeski
Just be sure to turn it on every now and then to keep the caps in good shape.

"Electrolytics do not suffer idleness well. They can cause big trouble when idle for long periods, needing periodic charging to stay "formed" and maintain the oxide layer that insulates the conducting plates. Sometimes they can be "reformed" by a slowly rising return to working voltage (see below). Even with regular use, electrolytics fail with age by drying out or leaking electrolyte following internal corrosion. If the electrolytic bulges, shows obvious loss of electrolyte, or simply can't be reformed you must replace it."

https://www.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu/~reese/electrolytics/